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very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials wanted to believe the vendors over us because the vendors assured them everything is safe. >> rose: and there was your appointment to the international workshop on international voting president clinton, this book ki
that you, i'm to the going to say mad scientist, i'm going to si highly inventive science. >> there we go. >> stephen: are working on. called region sis how synthetic buy only will reinvent nature and ourselves. do we need reinventing? we were invented once by god, the almighty father, maker of heaven and earth. are you playing, god, sir, because you certainly have the beard for it. (applause) just doing my job, right, we're engineers. we're fixing all these things that are broken. >> stephen: about are we broken. we're reinventing ourselves. >> some of us have disease. and some of those actually can be changed by changing our, not only our environment which is one thing we can change, but also our genetics. >> stephen: you can bring things back from the dead? and were you behind mitt romney's performance last night? (laughter) (cheers and applause) >> we can make copies of things that have elements of animals or bacterias, so forth that were extinct. >> stephen: okay so, you are work on the woolly mammoth, right. >> it's a possibility. first thing that is amazing progress in the field is
. the science has dismissed what the witchcraft held onto but people persist. the racial ideologies are being held to and now it's they, those peoples, blacks and latinos, a ba cal that's trying to undermine the process of democracy when the real deal is this president to the chagrin of many people on the left has deported more people and has been some would say hostile to the interests of expanding latino communities and now they're being seen as their protectors. again, the republicans articulate the exact opposite of what is the truth trying to convince us. thz an orwellian moment. this is 1984 except we're living in 2012 but we see the replication of such mendacity going on apace. >> when we move into the alternate reality and the truths which exist within the gop bubble -- >> which is democrats are importing illegal immigrants to inflate the vote. >> if we try to apply logic within the alternate reality, we only get a headache. it doesn't work. >> what they appeal to are the implicit bigotries and biases of the peep out there. the facts contradict the very notions we're speaking about, b
problem with things that are preventable in health care. areason's i got into this of the science of medical mistakes -- ever since i got into this area of science of medical mistakes, people have come up with all kinds of stories. people come up after conferences and it is almost as if somebody has a story of somebody they know or somebody they love. host: who is responsible? guest: i think there are no villains in this game. i think everybody is well intended. we have an opportunity for hospitals to increase the level of accountability by disclosing their patient outcomes. doctors' groups have come together and endorsed great ways to measure hospital quality. 2,000 track them at the patient level. do we think the public has a right to know about the quality of their hospitals? host: haven't we been tracking outcomes for 50 years? we just keep increasing the outcomes but it hasn't improved. guest: absolutely. there are all kinds of outcomes to attract. services grow and every hospital. a lot of people are falling through the cracks. we have great measures that doctors' groups i j
fake science behind them that is very popular in the anti-choice movement. >> when you combine that, laura, with the fact that at first when these legitimate rape comments came out, republicans started running from them, now they are stuck with them, let me give you an example. the chair of the gop, rins priebus, tried to distance himself from akin. here he is answering a reporter's question. >> if he stays in, is y'all's position eventually going to change in. >> no. no. no. he can be tied and we're not going to send him a penny. >> but now he's changed his tune. when he was asked if he thought akin was a better opg than mccaskill, priebus says is, quote, i have an obligation to make sure we win as many seats in the senate as possible. i mean, he's a real problem. >> there it is, reverend. i think a month ago republicans wouldn't touch akin with a ten-foot pole. i think the reason wasn't because they were so genuinely offended by akin's remarks but because they had no chance to win the senate race. they encouraged him to get out of the race hoping to replace them with a republican
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. less expensive option than a traditional lawyer? at legalzoom you get personalized services for your family and your business that's 100% guaranteed. so go to legalzoom.com today for personalized, affordable legal protection. . >>> tonight, 50 million people are expected to watch mitt romney and president obama debate america's future. how will the president make the case for four more years? how will mitt romney revitalize his campaign? theax next. that's next. rachel quit the corporate grind to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspire her customers for only $15 a month. [ dog barking ] her dream -- to be the area's hottest interior design office. [ children laughing ] right now, she just dreams of an office. get a free trial at constantcontact.com. >>> welcome bac
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] the exceedingly nimble, ridiculously agile, tight turning, fun to drive 2013 smart. ♪ >>> and we are back. thanks for watching "the ed show" tonight, folks. mitt romney is revealing his strategy for what could be one of the biggest nights of his campaign. big numbers here, folks. 52 million people are expected to watch next wednesday's debate with president obama. and mitt has a plan. he says he's going to go out and tell the truth. >> i think the president will not be able to continue to mischaracterize my pathway and so i'll be able to describe mine, he will describe his and people will make a choice. >> karl rove loves the idea. he wrote today in the "wall street journal," "mr. romney must call out the president and set the record straight in a presidential tone." sounds good. and romney's taken his advice to heart. in fact, he says there are three issues he needs to correct the president on. here's the first one -- >> w
. what i fault him for is junk science, and his inability to say truthful things. i mean, this is not a person that i think the republicans or anyone would want representing them. >> i fault him for that, and i think most americans understand that women should have the right to make choices. when a woman's life did -- >> pro-choice americans do. not pro-life americans. >> when women are raped and the victims of incest, they should have the right to do what they want to do. >> that's certainly your opinion. >> that's what most americans believe. >> this is not "the cycle." i have another topic to get to. >> are you here? >> i'm here. i want to go to the massachusetts race, scott brown is targeting elizabeth warren about her native-american heritage. let's play this and get your reaction. >> i'm scott brown and i approved this message. >> harvard thought that elizabeth warren was a minority because she said so. >> harvard touted her as a minority. >> initially she said she didn't know anything about it. >> she kept covering up and going deeper and deeper in the hole. >> eli
. dante scala is a professor of political science at the university of new hampshire, and "the washington post" deputy political editor, anne kornblut stuck around too. dante, you're on the ground there in the granite state. you're very familiar with that electorate. latest nbc news/marist poll, likely voters, president obama 51%, mitt romney 44%. what's the likelihood that the governor is able to close that gap between now and the first tuesday in november? >> i think it's going to take, craig, a national rebound for mitt romney to make it competitive here in new hampshire. there's no evidence that despite the fact that governor romney has campaigned in new hampshire off and on, really for most of the past decade, there's no evidence that he owns any kind of specific backyard advantage here in this new england state. his favorables to unfavorables are -- his unfavorables outweigh his favorables here in the state, which is striking given the amount of time he spent campaigning here. so new hampshire really is behaving the way it did four years ago, as a democratic-leaning bellwether state
, that is a really great question, and that's really sort of a gun is as much political science as anything else. i think a big, a big factor is am i know, i don't want to sound too earthly about this, but the rise of computer redistricting strangely enough, that the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic or all republican. that are relatively few swing states. we've seen a bunch of change in the past couple of election, but that's very much been the exception rather than the rule. so minutes of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear generate elections by and large. and does they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't fully explain the senate, because you can't redistrict the senate, but it is had and he knows impact at the state, state legislature level and the more polarized politics. we have also i think the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news, everybody watched walter cronkite or huntley an
. proposals in tv ads and on the stump like a million new manufacturing jobs, 100,000 new math and science teachers. feel mores a operational than an actual detailed plan. given the fact there's hunger for change, what change can the incumbent promise? the president has to come up with a good enough explanation of how reelecting him would break the partisan fever in washington. what does romney have to deal with? he hasn't differentiated from george bush's. and his plans lack specifics. in a one-on-one debate, candidates have a lot of control over how aggressive they are. both romney and the president are inexperienced in a one-on-one debate format. few details on the format. the president and romney will be at podiums, standing, not sitting, and there will be no basic time limits on their answers. it's not 90 seconds, buzzer, things like that. it's up to the discretion of the moderator, jim leierer. that's going to be up to him. but there's supposed to be a lot of leeway here over how long the conversations go. the debate is on domestic policy. 90 minutes is supposed to be devoted to the
of that is the president will also have to answer questions, how will he or 1,000 new science and math teachers been added to the rolls? how will 1 million more manufacturing jobs, that's cup one of the counter questions that the president will answer perhaps tonight as well. >> you could say the answer to that question was the americas jobs act stopped in congress and posed by republicans, which as you know, would have created almost 2 million jobs and by some estimates, would have created about 1.2% in gdp growth. so you can't separate the expectations of growth and jobs and so on away from the american jobs act. now, i know nobody wants to talk about that and treat it as if it is ancient history. the reality is that was the president's signature attempt to address these issues. teachers, firefighters. but it got nowhere. that doesn't mean he has not made a effort to put something together. he has. >> he will have the opportunity tonight to explain that as well as the republican opposition that he would face in the next term if he is elected. >> direct opposition. direct opposition from vice presidentia
who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train 2 million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. [ cheers and applause ] we need to cut our oil imports in half, create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that is the choice in this election and that is why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. [ cheers and applause ] now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got an extreme makeover, but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top down economics that we've seen before. he think that is if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts, that, yes, skew towards the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be involved. jobs and prosp
excellent question, scott. race has no biological basis. science rejects the concept. that's why when people ascribe biological certainties to race, they sound racist, but race is real as a social construct. it has so much social and political meaning and it's shaped so much of society that even if you think you're color blind, the perceptions of race are so baked into society you can't even easily super seisedem by being myopic. as dr. lopez once wrote, social meanings connect our faces to our souls, race is neither an essence nor an illusion but rather an ongoing contradictory self-reinforcing process subject to the macro forces of social and political struggle and the microeffects of daily decisions. that does to for the cycle. do you have any good on the show today? >> yes and you have stolen 40 seconds of my show and i'm not going to talk to you. good news for america fuels a republican conspiracy theory bigger than alien abduction. ♪ >> this morning we found out that the unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level since i took office. >> there is widespread mistrust
't mind sharing a little political science secret with you. although the debates routinely draw large viewing audiences, evidence shows that voters do learn a little bit of information from them, but political scientists also tend to agree that debates don't actually make a difference in the outcome. sorry. it's at least statistically true. most often, you can accurately predict where a race will end up after the debates by knowing where things stood before the debates. but don't tell the candidates. because with the first presidential debate coming up wednesday, governor romney and president obama will be gearing up for a fight. that's a good thing. we still need the debates. it's a so krat i can sem nor of sorts for the country having the candidates stand behind their podiums forced to answer for nair proposals. we get to see how the ideas stand up under questioning before you decide. at least for some of us, before we vote. here with me today is msnbc c contributor for the blog. latino.com's victoria did he francesco soto. she's a fellow at the university of texas. jam al simpsons
as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bart is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership is part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. william kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. purchaser is not view of the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education, bill bennett. he also served to john mccain. all of these t-bill regularly on fox news sunday in the fox news channel. i actually met ellen 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he's accomplished since that time. so the question i would like to pose for each of you, and i'll start with governor huntsman. what does the 2012 election reveal about the respective leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much. >> okay, what this panel -- >> see you later. >> you can extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that might be instructive. he isn't
. and so, you know, eventually i ended up in you see santa barbara as a student of political science. i think having grown up rural and kind kind of small, i guess i never imagined i could work in the white house or be part of the political campaign like the obama campaign. so i always coming in now, i was let the chance to do is talk like this because i hope there is something a mystery that might be inspiring as you allege are your success. and i think washington d.c. was for me on the other side of the road when i was going up but i know the world is smaller now and more accessible. but i think we can dream big dreams as my boss likes to tell me. my old boss likes of tommy. so we are going to talk about kind of my path to the white house. just quickly though, so i like to say that everything i learned about winning and success they learned on the campaign trail. there is always a winner and a loser. the political environment, just like the business world is highly competitive. and with every campaign season, there's always innovation incubators if you will. and so, guess the campaign
. there's no science to that, but when you see the explosion of smart phones they think they could be related. >> clayton: drowning deaths in fact, many parents busy at the pool, and not paying attention, deaths due to drowning and detrimental to see the kids on the smart phone when are' not with them and present, and psychologically. >> alisyn: that part is true, i try to put it away at home and at home, but our playground, oh. >> dave: well, hopefully you're not all-- give us good stories of times you may have been buried in the phone, not grim things, but something silly may have happened, a bump and a bruise, something like that e we'll talk about it later on the show. >> alisyn: to your headlines because new hope for families of victims of 9/11. the new york post reports the city forensic scientists will use a new tool to try to identify new remains, can take dna from bone fragments and identify person's eye and skin color. that's incredible. right now can only determine the sex. 1,120 remains still have not been identified. experts hope that soon they will be able to narrow d
this is such an inexact science. not just this month. it's nonsense. they have to figure out a more accurate way. >> the headline though is "good news for the president." absolutely. >> the headline is huge political news for the president. >> we'll be right back with what we learned. you paid...wow. hmmm. let's see if walmart can help you find the same look for less. okay. see? walmart has all these leading eyewear brands and styles. rockstar! really? yeah. oh, wow! oh, black frame looks good on you. yeah? you can get a complete pair starting at just -- $38. really?! and did you know that our glasses come with a free 12-month replacement guarantee? i didn't know walmart had all this. the price is impressive, the quality is too! come to walmart and see for yourself. find quality eyewear brands starting at just $38. only at walmart. what are they fitting, aliens? check out the latest collection of snacks from lean cuisine. creamy spinach artichoke dip, crispy garlic chicken spring rolls. they're this season's must-have accessory. lean cuisine. be culinary chic. check out the latest collection of
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)

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